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Harriet Donald, Land Use Partnerships Project Manager

A highly experienced land manager joins the Commission this month to work on proposals for Regional Land Use Partnerships across Scotland.

Harriet Donald joins the Scottish Land Commission on secondment from the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park Authority (LLTNPA).

The Scottish Government has committed to establishing regional land use partnerships to drive action and maximise the potential of Scotland’s land in tackling climate change. The Land Commission has been asked to advise Ministers on how best to establish effective partnerships that support local action and decision making.

The partnerships bring an opportunity for reform to engage more people in decisions about land and better connect strategic land use decisions with wider regional economic, community and environmental priorities.

Speaking about the proposed Regional Land Use Partnerships, the Commission’s Chief Executive Hamish Trench, said,

“The way that land is owned and used is central to some of the big ambitions in Scotland including climate action, productivity and a fair economy. 

“Reforms to both land ownership and use are needed to unlock opportunities for inclusive growth and to make the most of our land for the benefit of everyone. Scotland’s 2030 and 2045 net zero climate targets depend on land use change and to deliver this we must do it in a fair and productive way.

“We are delighted to have Harriet join our team. Working with partners, Harriet will look at the options for regional land use partnerships in ways that will connect across rural and urban Scotland, economic development, the planning and development system and placemaking.”

Speaking about her role, Harriet said,

“We know many people and organisations have supported the idea of regional land use partnerships for some time. I am looking forward to working with stakeholders to consider the structures and powers that the new partnerships will need to deliver the scale and pace of action required and encourage people to participate in local decision making about land.

“We have an opportunity to move forward and put in place partnerships that will have real influence and impact.”

The Land Commission will report to Ministers with proposals for the establishment of the partnerships in mid-2020. In doing this the Commission is reviewing lessons from existing approaches in Scotland, looking at international experience and will be engaging widely to develop proposals that are ambitious, practical and effective.