Tag: scotland

Not so pretty vacant. Scottish Land Commission and SEPA target new uses for derelict and vacant land

Two of Scotland’s leading land and environment bodies have set their sights on finding ways to bring thousands of acres of derelict and vacant land back into productive use.

The Scottish Land Commission and SEPA have today launched their innovative partnership and taskforce to transform Scotland’s approach to vacant and derelict land.  It will see the two organisations:

  •  Go beyond regulatory and planning compliance, to develop innovative approaches that will drive transformative  – not piecemeal – change
  • Challenge and change the way that Scotland deals with the issue of vacant and derelict land
  • Work with local authorities, other public agencies and organisations in the private and social enterprise sectors to identify the causes and consequences of long-term land vacancy and dereliction
  • Develop a 10 year strategy for eradicating the problem, setting ambitious targets supported at a local and national level.

The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey (SVDLS) was first set up 30 years ago, yet the amount of registered land has remained virtually static. There are currently around 11,600 hectares, two times the size of the City of Dundee, of derelict and urban vacant land in Scotland.

A new taskforce has been created, chaired by Steve Dunlop, Chief Executive Scottish Enterprise, to bring together leaders from the public, private and social enterprise sectors.  The taskforce will challenge and reshape the approach to bringing sites back into use which will have both economic and social benefits for all of Scotland.  Supported by the Land Commission and SEPA, the taskforce has the ambitious goal of halving the amount of Scotland’s derelict land by 2025.  The partnership and taskforce was launched today at the at ‘Unlocking Inclusive Growth: The Social Value Gathering’ conference in Edinburgh.

Launching the partnership and taskforce, Land Reform Secretary, Roseanna Cunningham said:

“Scotland has far too much unused, unproductive land.  As the Programme for Government makes clear, land can play a major role in creating high-quality places that support Scotland’s health, wellbeing and prosperity.  The Scottish Government fully support the Scottish Land Commission and SEPA in investigating how this land could be better utilised by communities across the country, and I am keen to see an ambitious and innovative approach to this stubborn problem.

“The ‘unlocking’ of vacant and derelict land touches on a number of important strands of work, including planning and regeneration.  It is also another key strand of our ambitious land reform agenda, which includes a recent commitment to continue our £10 million annual funding of the Scottish Land Fund, the creation of a register of controlling interests in land, and we’re exploring the expansion of existing Community Right to Buy mechanisms.”

Chair of the Taskforce Steve Dunlop said:

“In disadvantaged areas of Scotland it is estimated that three in every five people live within 500 metres of a vacant or derelict site.  The taskforce will help drive practical action and look for innovative ways to make productive use of vacant and derelict land for housing, commercial and green space uses.

”Rejuvenating vacant and derelict land brings about long term regeneration and renewal – unlocking growth, reviving communities, increasing community empowerment, reducing inequalities and inspiring local pride and activities”

Chief Executive of the Scottish Land Commission, Hamish Trench, said:

“The partnership with SEPA and the creation of the Taskforce is a catalyst for change from across the sectors in our approach to vacant and derelict land. We want to identify what can be done with policy, legislation and action to release this land to benefit the communities living in and around it, making more of Scotland’s land do more for Scotland’s people.

“As part of that we, along with the taskforce, are looking at tools and mechanisms to address the problem of vacant and derelict land with scope for far more innovation in finding ways to bring the land back into productive use.

“There are already some inspiring – recent – examples of what can be achieved in our cities and we want to encourage more of these approaches.”

SEPA Chief Executive, Terry A’Hearn, said:

“Climate change, marine plastics and extreme weather events show that we are putting too much pressure on the environment. We are over-using the planet. But we are under-using some of our land.

“This Sustainable Growth Agreement with Scottish Land Commission is designed to fix this problem. This innovative partnership will transform Scotland’s approach to bringing vacant and derelict land back into productive use by turning once dormant liabilities into national assets.”

Recent examples of transforming vacant or derelict land for productive use include

  •  The Shettleston Growing Project in Glasgow which has created a thriving community garden on land previously used for storing building materials
  • The recently completed Social Bite Village in Granton, Edinburgh to provide attractive accommodation for homeless people
  • Scotland’s biggest and most ambitious regeneration programme Clyde Gateway has brought a number of large scale vacant derelict land sites back in to productive use, with the most recent being Magenta.
  • Regeneration of a 28-acre site, formerly the home of Johnnie Walker, generating inward investment and stimulating jobs at.HALO Kilmarnock

Find out more

Report points way to using land value increases to deliver new housing and development

A report published today points the way towards effective approaches for Scotland to use publicly created increases in land value to help finance the infrastructure needed to deliver new housing and other development.

Written for the Scottish Land Commission by a team from Heriot-Watt University, the report reviewed the UK’s historic experience of land value capture and identifies what lessons current policy makers could take from this experience.

The report concludes that previous attempts at introducing land value capture have failed largely due to the absence of political consensus. Connected to this, schemes need to be well resourced and seen to be fair, to command public consent.

However, with politicians of all persuasions now talking about the issue, it may now be possible to shape an approach that works.

The value of land is heavily dependent on the use to which it can be put and the amenities and infrastructure in the surrounding area.

The value of well-connected land, with planning permission, located close to public amenities is typically much higher than land without such advantages and typically arises because of the public sector granting planning permission or investing in infrastructure.

Talking about the report, Hamish Trench, Land Commission Chief Executive said that ever since development rights were nationalised in 1947, a debate about how to capture for public benefit, the uplift in land value associated with planning permission and public investment in infrastructure, has waxed and waned.

“The shortage of affordable housing currently afflicting many parts of the UK means that this debate is well and truly back in the ascendant – but in looking for solutions, it is important that we learn from the past.

“Our purpose in looking at land value capture is to help deliver well-planned sustainable communities in places people want to live and at prices they can afford to pay – something everyone can get behind. Really this is about reinvesting some of the land value in unlocking development. A solution may well involve a range of approaches suited to the different market conditions and geographies across Scotland. In many parts of Scotland – and elsewhere in the UK – market demand for housing is relatively low so there is not a large value to capture.

The ability of public authorities to acquire land at or near existing use value has underpinned some of the more successful attempts at capturing land value both in the UK (New Towns) and elsewhere in Europe.

“Changes to the rules of compulsory purchase and compensation could be part of the answer to capturing publicly created uplifts in land value” explains Mr Trench “but our work so far suggests that effective solutions will need to look beyond this. Changes will need to be designed to support the delivery of wider place-making objectives and be combined with a more proactive role for public authorities.”

The Commission’s next steps will be to work with partners in the sector to explore different models of using publicly created uplifts in land value to finance investment in enabling infrastructure and to investigate further the questions of market and existing use value.

Today’s report is one in a series of pieces of research on land for housing and development, a priority area of work for the Scottish Land Commission.

Read the full report here.

Read the Commission’s briefing paper here

Discussion paper looks at increasing availability of agricultural land for new entrants

A simpler and more intelligible framework is now required in Scotland to open up the farming letting sector again and promote farming as a viable option for the next generation.

That’s the message in a new paper, ‘Encouraging agricultural lettings in Scotland for the 21st Century’, the fourth in a series of independent discussion papers from the Scottish Land Commission, aimed at stimulating debate about making more of Scotland’s land.

The framework needs to include both simpler tenancy law and a more commercial, business-minded and flexible approach to unlock more land for farm lettings.

In the paper, the author Jeremy Moody, maps the decline in the tenanted farming sector over the past century and the current, complex environment of different and sometimes overlapping, rules.

He assesses the past and current issues facing landlords and tenants including the perception among landlords that land letting is ‘high risk and low return’ and considers wider questions around the political climate and future changes in the context of Brexit.

The paper puts forward a number of proposals including a new income tax relief as an innovative way of addressing increasing land availability. This tax-based approach, seems likely to release more land; evidence from the Republic of Ireland suggests a significant increase in lettings there, following the adoption of a similar relief in 2015.

The paper’s author argues that letting is declining in Scotland despite a strong demand for access to land from new entrants and existing farmers needing to expand or improve the viability of their enterprises.

The Land Commission’s Tenant Farming Commissioner, Bob McIntosh, said:

“For a thriving tenant farming sector there needs to be a steady flow of new entrants to drive innovation and best practice, improve efficiencies and contribute towards the economic vitality of the sector.

“The Commission is looking at ways to stimulate the tenant farming sector and increase the availability of agricultural land. We commissioned this paper to encourage debate around the different approaches and incentives for letting of land.  We will discuss it at the next meeting of the Tenant Farming Advisory Forum in July and we’d welcome written responses by email, ahead of that meeting.

“The different approaches need to be considered alongside the work we’re doing on the current succession and retirement options for farmers and landowners.”

Speaking about his paper, Jeremy Moody said that promoting a positive attitude among both tenant farmers and landowners, “…depends on good quality relationships, with sympathy between the parties and positive approach by advisers. The approach should be to see that a good relationship for farming land should be mutually beneficial.”

Read the Land Lines discussion paper here.

New Codes of Practice to support community engagement by landowners

The Scottish Land Commission has announced today that it is developing a series of Codes of Practice for land owners, land managers and communities.

The Codes of Practice will set out what is expected for landowners, land managers and communities in engaging on decisions to do with land use. The Codes will support practical implementation of the ‘Guidance on Engaging Communities in Decisions Relating to Land’ published today, Wednesday 18 April 2018, by the Scottish Government.

The Commission is encouraging all land owners, and those with control over land, to adopt a proactive approach to engaging with communities in their plans for the land. The Codes will set out the expectations of what is reasonable and provide detail on how land owners and communities can have regard to the Land Rights and Responsibilities Statement.

The first Code will be published in the summer and will focus on how landowners, land managers and local communities engage.

Chair of the Scottish Land Commission, Andrew Thin, said:

“The Scottish Land Commission is working to increase the accountability of land ownership and promoting an open approach to decision making, all of which is a vital part of modernising our system of land ownership

“We are building on what already works well in the tenant farming sector by using good practice outlined in the Codes to provide clarity to all parties.

“Working closely with stakeholders we intend to develop Codes that are short, clear, practical and fair to all parties, setting out clear expectations of what normal and reasonable behaviour is. The Codes will also provide a mechanism to notify the Commission of an alleged non-compliance by an interested party.

“Along with the Codes we will also be providing guidance and practical advice to land owners, land managers and communities through newly appointed Community Engagement Advisers, to support improved engagement and accountability.”

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said:

“The Scottish Land Commission’s work to produce new Codes of Practice will greatly support the Scottish Government’s guidance for engagement between land owners and communities – resulting in greater collaboration on decisions about land.”

Tenant Farming Commissioner issues new Code and Guidance at Advisory Forum meeting

Scotland’s Tenant Farming Commissioner has issued a new Code of Practice on the Late Payment of Rent and a Guide on the use of Alternative Dispute Resolution today Tuesday 17 April, 2018.

The code is the fifth to be published by the Commissioner under the authority of the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2016. The code sets out the processes and behaviours that should be adopted in all cases of late payment of rent for agricultural tenancies.  It also outlines the steps to take by a Landlord, if rent payment is not made on time, to understand what has gone wrong and to ensure that the tenant is given every opportunity to rectify the matter.

The Guide on the use of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in the Scottish agricultural holdings sector outlines the ways in which ADR can we be used in order to resolve disputes between tenant farmers and landlords without going to court. If parties involved in a dispute take greater responsibility and ownership of it they are more likely to be satisfied with the outcome.

The code and guidance were published at the second meeting of the Tenant Farming Advisory Forum, chaired by the Scottish Land Commission’s Tenant Farming Commissioner, Bob McIntosh.

Bob McIntosh said:

“I am pleased to publish the latest code and guidance at the second meeting of the Tenant Farming Advisory Forum.

“It is important to have a forum where all of the industry bodies can come together keeping important issues at the forefront and working to secure the future of the tenant farming sector and the vital contribution it makes to Scotland’s rural economy.

“Strong and constructive relationships are a vital component in creating a thriving and prosperous tenant farming sector.   The code and guide published today both work to ensure that relationships are strengthened and do not collapse when under duress or in difficult circumstances.”

The Code of Practice for the Late Payment of Rent and Guide to – The use of Alternative Dispute Resolution in the Scottish agricultural holdings sector can be found on the Land Commission’s website www.landcommission.gov.scot/tenant-farming

Land Commission to look at potential for land value taxes in Scotland

The Scottish Land Commission is asking for tenders to investigate international experience in land value taxes to identify policy options for Scotland.

The Land Commission has issued a notice on Public Contracts Scotland (PCS) asking for contractors to submit tenders to carry out research in to the range of ways land value taxes have been used. This will inform future consideration of land value taxation options for Scotland based on the experiences of other countries.

Land value taxation is a tool for raising public revenue through an annual charge based on the rental value of land and typically levied against the unimproved value of that land not taking into account any buildings, services or infrastructure.

Chair of the Land Commission, Andrew Thin, said:

“Land value taxation has been an important element of the land reform debate in Scotland for several years and the Scottish Government has asked the Commission to look at the potential for land value based taxes.

“This initial work looks at how land value taxes have been used to realise relevant policy objectives elsewhere and what practical issues would need to be addressed in considering their use in Scotland.

“The work will also assess the potential of land value taxation in contributing to a more productive, accountable and diverse pattern of land ownership and use in Scotland. The final report, which is due to be submitted to the Commission in June 2018, will identify a set of potential policy options for further consideration.

“We are keen to stimulate discussion on if and how land value based taxes could help make more of Scotland’s land with stakeholders and amongst the general public. This important piece of work is the first step on that journey.”

Completed quotes must be submitted via PCS by 12:00 noon on the 19 January 2018.

More dates added to Land Commission’s series of events

The Scottish Land Commission has added more dates to its series of Meet & Greet events which are taking place across Scotland over the coming months.

Due to the success of the first Meet & Greet events held in April and May the Commission has announced the addition of three new dates to the series, with meetings to take place in Inverness, Islay and Oban.

Chair of the Scottish Land Commission, Andrew Thin, said:

“We are really encouraged by the response to the Meet & Greets so far. We have had varied audiences at the public meetings from those interested in community land ownership to tenant farming and with representation from both urban and rural communities.

“The discussions at the meetings have been really insightful and are helping the Commission to form our priorities for our three year strategic plan.

“We are keen to keep the momentum going with the additional meetings in Inverness, Islay and Oban and we hope to have even more over the coming months. This is a rolling programme of events and we would like to engage with as many people as possible.  I would urge everyone to attend a Meet & Greet in their area to find out more about who we are, what we do and importantly; how land reform can directly impact their community.”

The next Meet & Greet event is taking place at Leith Community Centre, Leith, Edinburgh on Thursday 22 June from 7pm and will be followed by:

  • NEW Tuesday 27 June, 7pm — Inverness

Scottish Land Commission, Longman House, 28 Longman Road, Inverness

  • NEW Thursday 13 July, 7pm – Islay

Ionad Chaluim Chille Ìle (the Columba Centre Islay), Bowmore

  • Thursday 27 July, 7pm — Biggar

Gillespie Centre, Biggar

  • NEW Thursday 17 August, 7pm – Oban

Corran Halls, Oban

  • Thursday 21 September, 7pm — Clydebank

Clydebank Town Hall, Clydebank

  • Thursday 26 October, 7pm — Dumfries

Georgetown Community Centre, Dumfries

  • Thursday 23 November, 7pm — Perthshire

Comrie Community Centre, Comrie

  • Thursday 22 February 2018, 7pm – Skye

The Fingal Centre, Portree

  • Thursday 22 March 2018, 7pm – Isle of Lewis

Bridge Community Centre, Stornoway

 

The events are free and tea and coffee will be provided. For more information visit www.landcommission.gov.scot, call 0300 244 4452 or email info@landcommission.gov.scot.